Baird's Sandpiper - At risk of sounding like a broken record

September 16, 2013  •  2 Comments

We stopped at Lost Lake on our way home late this afternoon to make a quick check of the area for unusual birds. The bad news is that there is actually no such thing as a quick check of the entire area - the good news is that I am relatively certain this lake basin should be considered for designation as a birding hotspot.  

While staking out a snag imprinted with the fresh activity of PILEATED WOODPECKER, a Forest Service employee stopped to tell us that she had sighted several of them in the area recently, and that she often finds them very close to, or flying across, the road in front of her truck.

Things became interesting for us only after we came to grips with the lack woodpecker activity and moved on with an open mind.

Our first surprise was the 14 AMERICAN PIPIT that Jill spotted on a sandbar in the lake, which lead us to our second surprise of four LEAST SANDPIPER, and one BAIRD'S SANDPIPER (a lifer for us) that we stumbled upon while sneaking up on the AM. PIPIT. 

AMERICAN PIPIT:

American Pipit

LEAST SANDPIPER:

Least Sandpiper

BAIRD'S SANDPIPER:

Baird's Sandpiper Baird's Sandpiper

Other species pictured below include the following;

HERMIT THRUSH, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, FOX SPARROW, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW

Hermit Thrush Hermit Thrush Hermit Thrush Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet Fox Sparrow Fox Sparrow

Golden-crowned Sparrow

 


Interactive Map - Click the "A" for directions to the lake:



Comments

jack williamson
Wow - Thanks Greg!

To think I was shrugging it off as just another Sooty while trying to get a better look a FOS Hermit Thrush.
Greg Gillson(non-registered)
Way to go, Jack! As far as I know this is a first county record for Slate-colored Fox Sparrow. Thick-billed Fox Sparrows nest in the manzanita scrub in the Oregon Cascades, including the area around Lost Lake. Sooty Fox Sparrows are winter visitors to the lowlands.

Slate-colored Fox Sparrows nest in the Washington Cascades and east as close as NE Oregon. Don't know for sure which population this one belongs to--I don't get much chance to see one. Keep it in the "listing bank" for when the Fox Sparrows are split!
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